Professor Brier is a social, educational, and labor historian who is also known for his work on digital technologies and tools to improve academic teaching, learning, and research. He is the co-author, with Michael Fabricant, of Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 2016). Professor Brier founded the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program at the Graduate Center, where he served as program coordinator and faculty member for the past 15 years. He also co-directs the Graduate Center’s M.A. in Liberal Studies Digital Humanities track and teaches in the Graduate Center’s American Studies Certificate Program. Dr. Brier was the founding Director of the Graduate Center’s American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning and the executive producer, co-author and editor of the project’s award-winning “Who Built America?,” a multimedia curriculum, including textbooks, videos, and CD-ROMs. He has co-produced a number of award-winning websites, including “History Matters” and the “September 11 Digital Archive.” Dr. Brier also served for a decade as a senior administrator at the Graduate Center.

 

Selected Publications

  • Co-Author (with Michael Fabricant), Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education

    Public higher education in the postwar era was a key economic and social driver in American life, making college available to millions of working men and women. Since the 1980s, however, government austerity policies and politics have severely reduced public investment in higher education, exacerbating inequality among poor and working-class students of color, as well as part-time faculty. In Austerity Blues, Michael Fabricant and Stephen Brier examine these devastating fiscal retrenchments

 

Recent News

  • Ph.D., U.S. History, UCLA, 1992
  • C.Phil. (with distinction), U.S. History, UCLA, 1971.
  • M.A., European History, UCLA, 1969
  • B.A., History, University of California, Berkeley, 1967

  • Multi-millions of dollars in support of the American Social History Project from NEH, the Ford, Rockefeller, and D.Witt Wallace Foundations

  • Labor History
  • History of Public Education
  • Race, Class, and Ethnicity in U.S. History
  • Digital Technologies
  • Tools to Improve Academic Teaching, Learning, and Research

  • Co-Author (with Michael Fabricant), Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education (John Hopkins Univ. Press, 2016).
  • Executive Editor, American Social History Project’s Who Built America? Working People and the Nation’s Economy, Politics, Culture, and Society, Third Edition, 2 vols. (Bedford-St. Martin’s, 2008).
  • Executive Editor, Forever Free: America in the Era of Emancipation and Reconstruction, written by Eric Foner; visual essays by Josh Brown (Knopf, 2005).
  • Executive Editor, American Social History Project’s Who Built America? Working People and the Nation’s Economy, Politics, Culture, and Society, Second Edition, 2 vols. (Worth Publishers, 2000).
  • Supervising Editor, American Social History Project, Freedom’s Unfinished Revolution: The Civil War and Reconstruction, (The New Press, 1996).
  • Supervising Editor and Co-Author, American Social History Project, Who Built America? Working People and the Nation’s Economy, Politics, Culture, and Society, First Edition, 2 vols. (Pantheon Books, 1990, 1992).
  • Co-Editor (with S. P. Benson and R. Rosenzweig), “Critical Perspectives on the Past,” Temple University Press: a series of thirty-nine monographs and essay collections presenting alternative and critical approaches to history, 1986 to 2011.
  • Co-Editor (with S. P. Benson and R. Rosenzweig), Presenting the Past: Essays on History and the Public, Temple University Press, 1986.

  • “Lessons Learned: Four Decades as a CUNY Educational Technologist,” Keynote Presentation, CUNY I.T. Conference, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY, November 20, 2018.
  • “The Impact of Austerity Policies on CUNY, Past and Present,” Innovations and Disruptions in American Higher Education: Views from the Professoriate, CUNY University Faculty Senate conference, CUNY Graduate Center, November 3, 2017.
  • “Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education,” NYPL Scholar Talk, Berger Forum, New York Public Library Schwarzman Bldg., December 6, 2016.
  • Keynote presentation, “Doing Digital Humanities in a Large Urban Public University,” Digital Humanities Working Group, Center for the Humanities, University of Illinois, Chicago, February 24, 2014.
  • Keynote presentation, “Doing Digital Humanities in a Small Liberal Arts College,” Franklin and Marshall College, January 10, 2014.
  • Conference presentation, “The Rise of the Digital Humanities at CUNY: The New Media Lab, Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Program as Organizations,” New Technologies: A Revolution for Organizations Conference, University of Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle, October 18, 2013.
  • Panelist, “Digital Dimensions of Graduate Education in American Studies,” American Studies Assn. Annual Meeting, San Juan, Puerto Rico, November 16, 2012.
  • Keynote Presentation, “History, Interactive Technology and Pedagogy: Past Successes and Future Directions,” 2012 Congress of the Canadian Historical Association, “Crossroads: Scholarship in an Uncertain World,” University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, May 30, 2012.
  • Roundtable presentation (with Ferdinando Fasce), “Researching Capitalism and Democracy in the American Global Twentieth Century,” Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, WI, April 19, 2012.
  • Keynote Lecture, “Doing Digital History: Thoughts on the Impact of Digital Technologies on Historical Research and Presentation,” Digital Storytelling Cluster Development Lecture Series, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, April 5, 2012.
  • Panelist, “Reshaping History: The Intersection of Radical and Women’s History” Roundtable, co-sponsored by the Journal of Women’s History and the Radical History Review, American Historical Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, January 5, 2012.
  • Panelist, “9/11 Part I: A People’s Response,” Gotham Center for New York City History, The Graduate Center, CUNY, September 21, 2011.
  • Keynote Panelist, “The Stakes of Memory: Commemorating 9/11,” Conference on the Rights of Memory: 9/11and the “Ground Zero Mosque,” The Rutgers Center for Migration and the Global City, Rutgers, Newark, NJ, November 8, 2010.
  • Roundtable Presentation, “Academic Technology and Pedagogy,” The Artifact in the Age of New Media conference, Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design, History, Material Culture, New York, NY, February 5, 2010.
  • Presentation (with Dr. Jennifer Brier), “Generations of Historians/Generations of History: Roundtable Discussion by Members of Multi-Generational Families in the Historical Profession,” American History Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, California, January 8, 2010.
  • Keynote Presentation, “Active Learning in the Digital Environment: Improving the Quality of Teaching and Learning in the Contemporary Classroom,” Critical Thinking in the Online Environment LACUNY Conference, York College, CUNY, March 27, 2009.
  • Keynote Presentation, “Cyberinfrastructure and the Liberal Arts: How Can It Be Sustained?” NERCOMP Cyberinfrastructure Conference, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, March 4, 2008.
  • Panelist, “Humanities Research in the Digital Age,” Museum of the Moving Image, “Open Collections: Exploring Online Cultural Resources” conference, Queens, New York, June 18, 2007.
  • Public Lecture, “The September 11 Digital Archive and Historical Memory,” and meeting with the staff of the World Trade Center Memorial and Museum, August 2, 2006.
  • Presentation, “The Intentional Archive: Why Historians Need to Become Archivists (or Begin to Think and Act Like Them),” Thriving in the Digital World keynote session at the Choices & Challenges: Hot Topics Facing Curators and Archivists symposium, The Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, Michigan, October 2004.
  • Testimony, American Council of Learned Societies Commission on Cyberinfrastructure for Humanities and Social Sciences, New York Public Library, June 19, 2004.
  • Presenter on technology and the arts, “Why Are We Behind the Curve?” panel, The Edge: Grant Makers in the Arts 2003 Conference, Seattle, Washington, October 2003.
  • Plenary Panelist, “Wireless in Higher Education: Where do we go from here?” New York City College of Technology, September 19, 2003.
  • Moderator, “How Historians Will Write the History of September 11” panel, September 11 as History: Collecting Today for Tomorrow symposium, the Library of Congress, September 10, 2003.
  • “New History and New Media,” Fourth Annual Samuel D. Ehrenpreis Memorial Lecture, Bronx Community College, CUNY, October 2001.
  • “The Personal Is Historical: Individual and Collective Memory in (Re)Constructing the History of Ordinary Americans,” International Conference on Public and Private in American History: Family, Subjectivity and Public Life in the Twentieth Century,” Turin, Italy, May 2001.
  • “The American Social History Project: New Media Projects and Prospects,” Association of American Colleges and Universities annual meeting, “Degrees of Value: Technology, Markets, and the Aims of Education,” New Orleans, January 2001.
  • “The Critical Role of Web Integration and e-Government Initiatives,” Panelist, New York Software Summit 2000, Brooklyn, New York, September 2000.
  • “The Use of New Media in Humanities Education,” Community College Humanities Association conference for teachers, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, December 1999.
  • “Evaluating the Use of the Internet and New Media on Teaching and Learning,” Roundtable discussion, Northeast Political Science Association annual meeting, Boston, November 1998.
  • “Imagining Good History in Documentary Film,” History and Media conference, Ninth Biennial Group Symposium, Milan, Italy, June 1998.
  • “Oral History and Public History: The Intellectual Possibilities of New Media,” Keynote address, III National Oral History Conference, Buenos Aires, Argentina, October 1997.
  • “The Writer in the Electronic Age,” The Authors’ Guild Foundation, NYU, November 1995.
  • “Who Built America? and the Promise of Educational Technology,” The College Board, September 1995.
  • Charles Hamilton Houston Forum on “Frederick Douglass and African-American History: A Filmmakers’ Symposium,” Amherst College, February 1995.
  • “The Who Built America? Project and Historical Research” at the Beyond Gutenberg: Hypertext and the Future of the Humanities Conference, Yale University, May 1994 (with Roy Rosenzweig).
  • “Integrating Multimedia into the Curriculum,” CUNY Office of Academic Computing seminar, January 1994. “Writing an Electronic Book: Who Built America?” American Historical Association annual meeting, San Francisco, CA, January 1994 (with Roy Rosenzweig).
  • “Who Built America? Putting a History Book on CD-ROM” Gateways to Knowledge Conference, Harvard University, November 1993.
  • “Electronic Courseware–Who Built America?” Apple Exhibit, Educom annual conference, Cincinnati, October 1993.
  • “Writing an Electronic History Book: A Report from the Front,” Thomas Watson Center on Information Technology, Brown University, April 1993 (with Roy Rosenzweig).

  • LHIS 601, graduate-level course in U.S. Labor History

  • ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE AND SERVICE
    • Member, Executive Committee, M.A. in Liberal Studies Program, CUNY Graduate Center, Fall 2014 to the present.
    • Faculty representative, Advisory Committee, Certificate Program in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, Summer 2017 to the present.
    • Faculty Representative from the Graduate Center, CUNY to New York Public Library Research Advisory Group, Fall 2013 to Fall 2016.
    • Founding Member, Editorial Collective, The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, an online journal (premier issue, Spring 2012), 2011-2017.
    • Member, Review Committee, Roy Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History, American Historical Association, 2009 to 2016.
    • Panelist, Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities, Washington D.C., April 4, 2010.
    • Academic sabbatical, Nov. 1, 2007 – Jan. 31, 2008; April 11 – July 14, 2008
    • Review panelist, Small Business Innovative Research program, Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, June 2007.
    • Chair, Advisory Board, Center for History and New Media, George Mason University, 2001 – present.
    • Review panelist, Small Business Innovative Research program, National Institutes of Health, March 2000 and March 2001.
    • Outside Evaluator, Interactive Telecommunications Program, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, Spring 2000.
    • Member, Board of Directors, and Chair, Nominating Committee, The Feminist Press, 2000 – 2006.
    • Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Multi-Media History, on-line history journal at http://www.albany.edu/jmmh/, 1998 – 2000.
    • Review panelist, Digital Libraries Initiative, Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, 1998 and 2000.
    • Panelist, EDSITEment panel, Education and Research Division, National Endowment for the Humanities, 1998.
    • Panelist, Teaching with Technology panel, Education and Research Division, National Endowment for the Humanities, 1997.
    • Member, New-York Historical Society Historical Advisory Committee, 1996 – 2001.
    • National Nominator, 1996 Rockefeller Foundation Intercultural Film/ Video/ Multimedia Fellowships.
    • Member, Erik Barnouw Award Committee, Organization of American Historians, 1993-96.
    • Panelist, Public Humanities Projects, Division of Public Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, November 1994.
    • Member, Herbert Feis Award Committee, American Historical Association, 1987-89.
    • Senior Research Scholar, Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York, 1982-89.
    • Instructor, Public History Program, Department of History, New York University, 1984: designed and taught graduate seminar on Media and History.
    • Associate Director, NEH Summer Seminar for Labor Leaders (Herbert G. Gutman, Director), The Graduate Center, 1979 and 1980: co-designed and taught model labor history curriculum for trade unionists, using film, walking tours and literature that became the inspiration for American Social History Project.
  • ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE AND SERVICE
    • Interim Vice President for Information Resources, The Graduate Center, CUNY, Fall 2004. Chair, Search Committee for Assistant Vice President for Information Resources, The Graduate Center, CUNY, Fall 2004.
    • Chair, Disciplinary Cluster meetings of Executive Officers (department chairs), The Graduate Center, CUNY, 2002-2005.
    • Member, Academic Planning Committee, The Graduate Center, CUNY, 2002 – 2005.
    • CUNY-wide Coordinator, Cluster Hiring Initiative in New Media/Communications, Spring 2002-Spring 2004.
    • Chair, Search Committee for Vice President for Student Affairs, The Graduate Center, CUNY, Spring 2002.
    • The Graduate Center liaison, CUNY Online project, supported by a major grant from the Sloan Foundation, 2000-2004.
    • The Graduate Center representative, CUNY Task Force on Educational Technology, 2000 –2003.
    • The Graduate Center representative, Board of Directors, CUNY Institute for Software Design and Development, 1999 – 2002.
    • CUNY representative, Mayor’s Task Force on New Media, Subcommittee on Education & Workforce Development, Fall 1999.
    • Chair, President’s Task Force on Instructional Technology and Media, 1998-99, The Graduate School and University Center, CUNY.
    • Chair, Committee for the Science Center, 1998-99, The Graduate School and University Center, CUNY.
    • Member, University Library and Educational Technology Task Force, City University of New York, 1996-97: Representative on a University-wide task force to explore the impact of educational technology on teaching and learning and on library practice at CUNY.
    • Member, Planning Board, Northeast Regional Technology Consortium (NetTech), City University of New York 1995-96: CUNY Representative to a thirteen-state educational consortium designed to increase the use of educational technology in the public schools.
    • Chair, Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on CUNY-TV, 1993: direct the evaluation of CUNY’s cable television channel and the drafting of a major report recommending new directions in the university’s telecommunications policies.

Stephen Brier