Areas of expertise: labor history; history of public education; race, class, and ethnicity in U.S. history; digital technologies and tools to improve academic teaching, learning, and research.

Professor Brier is a social, educational, and labor historian who is also known for his work on digital technologies and tools to improve academic teaching, learning, and research. He is the co-author, with Michael Fabricant, of Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education.  Professor Brier founded the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program at the Graduate Center, where he served as program coordinator and faculty member for the past 15 years.  He also co-directs the Graduate Center’s M.A. in Liberal Studies Digital Humanities track and teaches in the Graduate Center’s American Studies Certificate Program. Dr. Brier was the founding Director of the Graduate Center’s American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning and the executive producer, co-author and editor of the project’s award-winning “Who Built America?,” a multimedia curriculum, including textbooks, videos, and CD-ROMs. He has co-produced a number of award-winning websites, including “History Matters” and the “September 11 Digital Archive.” Dr. Brier also served for a decade as a senior administrator at the Graduate Center.

 

Recent News

The UFT’s Opposition to the Community Control Movement

September 12, 2018

Professor Stephen Brier co-authored “Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education,” which examines the social consequences of disinvestment in public higher education, particularly its effects on growing economic disparities in our cities and communities.

Professor Stephen Brier Co-Publishes Book on Austerity and Public Education

September 12, 2016

Professor Stephen Brier co-authored “Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education,” which examines the social consequences of disinvestment in public higher education, particularly its effects on growing economic disparities in our cities and communities.

Stephen Brier